“Coping with Dysfunction: How Can the American Political System Emerge from its Morass?”

Dr. Norman J. Ornstein   

Thursday, October 2, 2014                                           

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Norman Ornstein, resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, is a long-time observer and scholar of Congress and politics, who writes the weekly “Washington Inside Out”column for National Journal and The Atlantic. For thirty years, he was an election eve analyst for CBS News; in 2012, he was a principal on-air election eve analyst for BBC News. He served as co-director of the AEI-Brookings Election Reform Project and participates in AEI’s Election Watch series. Mr. Ornstein led a working group of scholars and practitioners that helped shape the McCain-Feingold campaign financing reform law

Dr. Ornstein’s many books include The Permanent Campaign and Its Future (AEI Press, 2000), and The Broken Branch: How Congress Is Failing America and How to Get It Back on Track, with Thomas E. Mann (Oxford University Press, 2006), which was named by the Washington Post one of the best books of 2006 and called by The Economist “a classic.” Most recently, his book It’s Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided With the New Politics of Extremism (also with Thomas Mann, Basic Books, 2012), was a New York Times bestseller, and was named Book of the Year by Ezra Klein’s Wonkblog, one of the ten best books on politics in 2012 by The New Yorker; and one of the best books of 2012 by the Washington Post. Foreign Policy magazine named Ornstein one of 2012’s 100 Top Global Thinkers.

Ornstein earned his BA from the University of Minnesota and an MA and PhD from the University of Michigan. Among his honors, he was elected as a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2004, and was awarded the Goodnow Lifetime Achievement Award by the American Political Science Association in 2006. In 2007 he received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree by the University of Michigan in 2007, and in 2013 the second annual “Above Average” Alumni Award (named for its first recipient, Garrison Keillor) by the University of Minnesota Alumni Association.

The program can be found here.