In keeping with Carolina’s Making Connections Curriculum, UNC Public Policy’s experiential education programs offer students structured, active learning opportunities that invite them to integrate and apply their academic knowledge and skills in a real-world policy environment.

Opportunities include:

Students are encouraged to secure an internship as part of the General Education experiential education requirement. Students who wish to complete a public policy internship can enroll in PLCY 293. Students may receive academic credit for an approved internship if it provides an academically relevant policy research-related experience, but PLCY 293 does not count as elective credit toward the public policy major. For PLCY 293, interested students should review the Internship Application and PLCY 293 syllabus and contact Dr. Anna Krome-Lukens prior to the start of the internship. The Duncan MacRae Jr. Public Policy Internship Grant aims to support internship opportunities for public policy majors and to defer some of the costs associated with engaging in unpaid summer internships.

The Clinic (PLCY 393) offers an opportunity for students to identify and solve a public policy problem for a non-profit organization. Enrollment requires instructor permission but is open to undergraduates from all majors and minors in the College of Arts and Sciences. Working in small consulting teams with faculty assistance, students engage with non-profit organizations and learn how to use their knowledge and skills to propose solutions to complex problems. The Clinic provides an excellent preparation for the senior Capstone or a valuable stand-alone experience. The course is an APPLES Service-Learning Course. Questions about the program should be directed to Dr. Daisha M. Merritt or Dr. Anna L. Krome-Lukens, Director of Experiential Education.

For a detailed description of 2015-2016 projects, click here.

The Capstone course (PLCY 698) is the culminating experience of the UNC Public Policy undergraduate major and is required for all seniors except those who complete an honors thesis. Students should register for the course in the fall or spring of their senior year. The course provides a bridge between policy analysis as it is studied in an academic setting and policy analysis as it is practiced in the workplace. Students work in small teams to produce actionable, client-centered, public policy research for a non-profit organization or government agency. Over the course of a semester, student teams meet with their client, develop a work plan, research relevant policy issues, collect relevant data, identify and analyze policy options, and produce a final professional-level report that includes specific recommendations for action. Students also develop skills in team work, leadership, communication, professional etiquette, and time management. Questions about the program should be directed to Dr. Anna L. Krome-Lukens, Director of Experiential Education.

For a detailed description of 2015-2016 projects, click here.